Chowdhury death sentence upheld

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APPEAL DENIED  This file photo taken on December 19, 2006 shows former Prime Minister Khalead Zia’s parliamentary affairs adviser, Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury, sitting under a poster of Zia in Dhaka. Bangladesh’s highest court on July 29, 2015 upheld the death sentence handed down to the top opposition politician Chowdhury for war crimes during the country’s 1971 independence conflict against Pakistan. AFP PHOTO

APPEAL DENIED
This file photo taken on December 19, 2006 shows former Prime Minister Khalead Zia’s parliamentary affairs adviser, Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury, sitting under a poster of Zia in Dhaka. Bangladesh’s highest court on July 29, 2015 upheld the death sentence handed down to the top opposition politician Chowdhury for war crimes during the country’s 1971 independence conflict against Pakistan. AFP PHOTO

DHAKA: Bangladesh’s top court Wednesday upheld the death sentence handed down to a top opposition politician for atrocities committed during the 1971 independence war, including the slaughter of around 200 Hindus.

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The Supreme Court, led by Chief Justice S.K. Sinha, dismissed Salahuddin Quader Chowdhury’s appeal against a death sentence handed down by a controversial war crimes tribunal two years ago.

It was the first time a senior politician of the main opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) had been sentenced for his role in the conflict, which saw what was then East Pakistan secede from Islamabad.

The 66-year-old leader was originally found guilty by the International Crimes Tribunal, a controversial domestic war crimes court, of nine charges including genocide, torture and rape.

Chowdhury, whose father was a former speaker of Pakistan and also served as its acting president, has previously served as an advisor to BNP leader and two times former premier Khaleda Zia.

Police stepped up security in Dhaka and Chowdhury’s home city of Chittagong ahead of the judgment.

Although BNP had condemned the war crimes trials as “politically motivated,” major protests against the verdict were unlikely.

The party has been weakened by a major crackdown earlier this year when it launched a futile three-month long nationwide transport blockade in an effort to topple the government of Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina.

Previous verdicts against Islamist politicians have sparked the country’s deadliest political violence since independence. Hundreds of people were killed as police brutally suppressed tens of thousands of rioting Islamists.

‘Merciless killer’  
Prosecutors described Chowdhury, a minister in the previous BNP-led government, as a merciless killer who murdered more than 200 Hindus, including the owner of a well-known herbal medicine company.

His trial was told that Chowdhury had dragged owner Nutan Chandra Sinha out of his prayer room and Pakistani soldiers had then shot him.

The BNP and its Islamist allies have said the tribunal is a tool for Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina’s Awami League to silence its opponents.

Bangladesh has struggled to come to terms with its violent birth, in which what was then East Pakistan split from Islamabad to become independent.

The government set up the tribunal in 2010, saying trials were needed to heal the wounds of the 1971 war, in which it says three million people were killed and 200,000 women raped.

Independent estimates put the death toll at between 300,000 and 500,000.

AFP

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