• Don’t let your child’s fever fool you

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    You can’t go by touch. A child’s skin temperature varies with exercise, excitement and sleep. That’s why it’s wise to use a thermometer when testing for a fever.

    You can’t go by touch. A child’s skin temperature varies with exercise, excitement and sleep. That’s why it’s wise to use a thermometer when testing for a fever.

    WHEN your child isn’t feeling well, your main concern is to help him or her get better. However, when it comes to children’s fevers, your first step should always be to determine whether or not your child actually has a fever. This can save your child from receiving unnecessary medication or even hospitalization.

    Fever myth: “If your child feels warm, she must have a fever.” While he or she may feel warm, a child’s skin temperature varies with exercise, excitement and sleep-making your hands poor thermometers.

    Fever fact: Use a thermometer, so you can get an accurate temperature. Remember, the temperature for a fever depends on where you put the thermometer. A rectal temperature of 100.4 degrees or higher, an oral temperature of 100 degrees and above, and an armpit temperature of 99 degrees all mean that your child has a fever.

    Parent education
    To help educate caregivers about the nature of fevers, PediaCare® has partnered with father and pediatrician Dr. David Hill, author of Dad to Dad: Parenting like a Pro, to develop a series of videos to debunk a number of myths about kids and fevers.

    To view Dr. Hill’s videos, visit www.youtube.com/PEDIACARE.

    For more information, visit PediaCare.com, or join them on Facebook at Facebook.com/PediaCare and @PediaCare on Twitter for updates. North American Precis Syndicate

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