Easy and simple ways to save the earth

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Moje Ramos-Aquino, Fpm

Moje Ramos-Aquino, Fpm

I wake up each morning at 3 a.m. because it gets really cold and I have to turn off the electric fan. This is unusually cold weather we are having for the past three weeks now. Is this caused by global warming? And is global warming caused by our reckless and wanton misuse of things?

Now let’s have some answers to the questions we have been asking for the past two columns. Here are ways and means to go green culled from the book 50 Ways to Save the Earth by Anne Jankeliowitch with some local examples.

Use reusables. E.g., cloth diapers, not throwaway diapers; washable hankies, not tissue paper; washcloth, not wipes; dish towels, not paper towels; washable plates, tumblers and cups, not disposables; reusable razors, not disposables. These disposables take a long time to decompose because they contain materials like plastic and nylon.

Sort your trash. Recycle or sell to recycling organizations or donate to your favorite charity. The television show Eat Bulaga collects plastic bottles to make school desks.


Save paper, recycle, reuse. Use both sides of writing papers. Use last year’s half-full notebooks. Sell old newspapers and magazines, used cardboard, office papers for recycling. Add cardboard, newspapers and office papers to your compost that will eventually become fertilizer to your plants.

Collect old batteries. They are extremely toxic (cadmium, mercury, lead, nickel, zinc or manganese) and should never be thrown together with other trash. Put them in special bins provided in supermarkets like the one in Rockwell Mall. Best is to use rechargeable batteries.

Avoid plastic bags like a plague. Always bring a reusable bag with you. I notice in the bakery near my house that they put their products in two plastic bags all the time—clear plastic first, then sando plastic bag—even if you buy only one or two pieces of pan de sal. No wonder that our street, though not the main one, is littered with all kinds of plastic wrappers.

People peel their candy, throw the wrapper just like that. Or keep those plastic wrappers and put them in the proper waste can or reuse them.

Remember that styrofoam never decomposes. And they kill fish and plug sewage among other destructive effects of using them and throwing them away recklessly.

Compost your waste. Vegetable and fruit peels and scraps, fallen leaves, twigs and branches of trees, eggshells when composted can be used as fertilizer. What should not go to your compost bin are cooked food, cat and dog pooh, table scraps like meat and fish.

Take back unused medicines. Always take notice of the expiry dates of your medicine. If they are still okay, take them back to your pharmacist or donate them to a nearby public clinic or hospital to treat other sick people. Expired medicine could be toxic and should be destroyed under the best condition.

Eco-wrap gifts. I am happy to receive gifts last Christmas wrapped in magazine pages or ordinary bond paper. I do not wrap my gifts ever since (they are usually books). Think of millions of wrapping paper and ribbons ripped and thrown in the trash—let’s not add to that. Or do not rip the wrapper and ribbons, reuse them.

Buy local and native fruits, vegetables and meats. Make sure they are organically or naturally farmed. When we buy organic food, we encourage organic or natural agriculture, which is good for our health and for the environment. There’s plenty of choices! Caution: Free-range is not necessarily organic; it simply means that the animals were not caged. But if they are not caged but there are thousand or millions of them in one small area and they are unable to move naturally, then they are also not good. Many so-called free-ranged chicken, for example, are still given with chemical feeds, hormones and antibiotics.

Give toys not anymore being used by your children to organizations that can redistribute them. Not just for Christmas. Don’t just let them gather dust in boxes or clutter your shelves. There are many other needy children who could be entertained by them.

Rent, borrow or ask before you buy. Read books in the public library.

Borrow a blender if you will not use them regularly. Rent a car or a long gown, a suit, and others if you use them only occasionally. I am proud to wear the castoffs of my best friend Gigie Peñalosa, because she has very good taste in clothes.

We have enough things to do at the moment. Let’s continue the list next column. Share with us your own earth-saving techniques at moje629@gmail.com.

ASTD 2014 International Conference & Exposition. The ASTD 2014 International Conference and Exposition brings the training and development industry to life. Each aspect of the industry is covered for every level of practitioner, from chief executive officer to specialist, from dean to student. At ASTD 2014, join more than 9,000 of your learning colleagues from around the globe at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington, D.C., May 4 to 7, 2014, to share best practices and insights. You’ll learn current and future trends, and find out how to apply them on the job to get results. You’ll learn from world-renowned thought leaders, and industry luminaries. ASTD 2014 will provide the tools and resources necessary to move you and your organization forward. Join our delegation for great discount on registration, email us at moje629@gmail.com.

Easy and simple ways to save the earth

Moje Ramos-Aquino,
FPM LEARNING & INNOVATION

I wake up each morning at 3 a.m. because it gets really cold and I have to turn off the electric fan. This is unusually cold weather we are having for the past three weeks now. Is this caused by global warming? And is global warming caused by our reckless and wanton misuse of things?
Now let’s have some answers to the questions we have been asking for the past two columns. Here are ways and means to go green culled from the book 50 Ways to Save the Earth by Anne Jankeliowitch with some local examples.
Use reusables. E.g., cloth diapers, not throwaway diapers; washable hankies, not tissue paper; washcloth, not wipes; dish towels, not paper towels; washable plates, tumblers and cups, not disposables; reusable razors, not disposables. These disposables take a long time to decompose because they contain materials like plastic and nylon.
Sort your trash. Recycle or sell to recycling organizations or donate to your favorite charity. The television show Eat Bulaga collects plastic bottles to make school desks.
Save paper, recycle, reuse. Use both sides of writing papers. Use last year’s half-full notebooks. Sell old newspapers and magazines, used cardboard, office papers for recycling. Add cardboard, newspapers and office papers to your compost that will eventually become fertilizer to your plants.
Collect old batteries. They are extremely toxic (cadmium, mercury, lead, nickel, zinc or manganese) and should never be thrown together with other trash. Put them in special bins provided in supermarkets like the one in Rockwell Mall. Best is to use rechargeable batteries.
Avoid plastic bags like a plague. Always bring a reusable bag with you. I notice in the bakery near my house that they put their products in two plastic bags all the time—clear plastic first, then sando plastic bag—even if you buy only one or two pieces of pan de sal. No wonder that our street, though not the main one, is littered with all kinds of plastic wrappers. People peel their candy, throw the wrapper just like that. Or keep those plastic wrappers and put them in the proper waste can or reuse them.
Remember that styrofoam never decomposes. And they kill fish and plug sewage among other destructive effects of using them and throwing them away recklessly.
Compost your waste. Vegetable and fruit peels and scraps, fallen leaves, twigs and branches of trees, eggshells when composted can be used as fertilizer. What should not go to your compost bin are cooked food, cat and dog pooh, table scraps like meat and fish.
Take back unused medicines. Always take notice of the expiry dates of your medicine. If they are still okay, take them back to your pharmacist or donate them to a nearby public clinic or hospital to treat other sick people. Expired medicine could be toxic and should be destroyed under the best condition.
Eco-wrap gifts. I am happy to receive gifts last Christmas wrapped in magazine pages or ordinary bond paper. I do not wrap my gifts ever since (they are usually books). Think of millions of wrapping paper and ribbons ripped and thrown in the trash—let’s not add to that. Or do not rip the wrapper and ribbons, reuse them.
Buy local and native fruits, vegetables and meats. Make sure they are organically or naturally farmed. When we buy organic food, we encourage organic or natural agriculture, which is good for our health and for the environment. There’s plenty of choices! Caution: Free-range is not necessarily organic; it simply means that the animals were not caged. But if they are not caged but there are thousand or millions of them in one small area and they are unable to move naturally, then they are also not good. Many so-called free-ranged chicken, for example, are still given with chemical feeds, hormones and antibiotics.
Give toys not anymore being used by your children to organizations that can redistribute them. Not just for Christmas. Don’t just let them gather dust in boxes or clutter your shelves. There are many other needy children who could be entertained by them.
Rent, borrow or ask before you buy. Read books in the public library. Borrow a blender if you will not use them regularly. Rent a car or a long gown, a suit, and others if you use them only occasionally. I am proud to wear the castoffs of my best friend Gigie Peñalosa, because she has very good taste in clothes.
We have enough things to do at the moment. Let’s continue the list next column. Share with us your own earth-saving techniques at moje629@gmail.com.

ASTD 2014 International Conference & Exposition. The ASTD 2014 International Conference and Exposition brings the training and development industry to life. Each aspect of the industry is covered for every level of practitioner, from chief executive officer to specialist, from dean to student. At ASTD 2014, join more than 9,000 of your learning colleagues from around the globe at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Washington, D.C., May 4 to 7, 2014, to share best practices and insights. You’ll learn current and future trends, and find out how to apply them on the job to get results. You’ll learn from world-renowned thought leaders, and industry luminaries. ASTD 2014 will provide the tools and resources necessary to move you and your organization forward. Join our delegation for great discount on registration, email us at moje629@gmail.com.

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