Fil-Am sailor killed in Japan collision

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TOKYO: The US Navy on Monday identified seven sailors killed, including a Filipino-American, after its destroyer collided with a Philippine-flagged container ship off Japan.

In a statement, the Navy said the deceased were Fire Controlman 2nd Class Carlos Victor Ganzon Sibayan, 23, a Filipino American from Chula Vista, California; Gunner’s Mate Seaman Dakota Kyle Rigsby, 19, from Palmyra, Virginia; Yeoman 3rd Class Shingo Alexander Douglass, 25, from San Diego, California; Sonar Technician 3rd Class Ngoc T Truong Huynh, 25, from Oakville, Connecticut; Gunner’s Mate 2nd Class Noe Hernandez, 26, from Weslaco, Texas; Personnel Specialist 1st Class Xavier Alec Martin, 24, from Halethorpe, Maryland; and Fire Controlman 1st Class Gary Leo Rehm Jr., 37, from Elyria, Ohio.

The sailors, aged between 19 and 37, were reported missing after Saturday’s predawn collision which triggered a major US-Japanese search operation.

Their bodies were found a day later when the ship returned to port and divers scoured damaged areas of the 154-meter (500-foot) USS Fitzgerald, which was commissioned in 1995 and deployed in the Iraq war in 2003.


“The remains of seven sailors previously reported missing were located in flooded berthing compartments, after divers gained access to the spaces,” the Navy said Monday.

The collision happened 56 nautical miles (104 kilometers) southwest of Yokosuka, where the Fitzgerald is based, in a busy shipping channel that is a gateway to major container ports in Tokyo and nearby Yokohama.

There have been several collisions involving large vessels in the area over the past five years and attention is now turning to the investigation into what caused the deadly accident.

The container ship, the 222-meter Philippine-flagged ACX Crystal, made a 180 degree turn shortly before the accident, according to data from the Marine Traffic website. It was not immediately clear what prompted the sharp turn.

The huge commercial vessel came into port with large scrapes on its bow, but none of its 20 crew were injured.

Right of way?

Japan’s coastguard is conducting a probe, including interviewing the Japanese-owned container ship’s Filipino crew, although the US has primary jurisdiction in probing accidents involving military personnel.

Citing local investigators, Japan’s top-selling Yomiuri newspaper said Monday that the damage on both ships suggests they were traveling in the same direction when the crash occurred.

Under maritime law, the container ship had an obligation to avoid a collision if it was trying to overtake the destroyer from behind.

But if the container vessel was approaching from the US ship’s right side, the destroyer had the obligation to give it the right of way, a Japanese coastguard spokesman said.

“Generally speaking, if a ship sees another vessel on its right hand side it has the obligation to avoid” a collision, he added.

The navy and coastguard are conducting separate investigations, but the Japanese side will ask for US cooperation in its inquiries, a spokesman for Japan’s transport safety board told Agence France-Presse.

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