• Five held in Australia’s largest people-smuggling raids

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    SYDNEY: Five men from Iran, Pakistan and Afghanistan have been arrested and accused of facilitating the passage of up to 132 asylum-seekers boats in Australia’s largest-ever people-smuggling sting, police said on Thursday.

    The men—an Iranian, 21, a Pakistani national, 46, and three Afghans aged 40, 34 and 33—were detained in a major nationwide operation culminating 12 months of work and seven separate probes into 132 voyages.

    Hundreds of asylum-seekers have died making the perilous voyage to Australia in recent years on rickety, overloaded boats, mostly from Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

    Four of the men, described by police as “key” syndicate members, came to Australia on smuggling boats themselves between May 2012 and July 2013.

    The ring was allegedly active in the recruitment of passengers and the collection and transfer of money.

    Three are in immigration detention, and stand accused of orchestrating activities from Indonesia prior to their arrival.

    One of the men, Barkat Ali Wahide from Afghanistan, appeared briefly in court in Perth, telling a magistrate he had been in immigration custody for 17 months.

    He was charged with two counts of smuggling—each charge relating to two passengers—and returned to detention until his next hearing in September.

    The other men were also expected to appear in court on Thursday.

    Police said it was Australia’s largest ever people-smuggling strike, relying on evidence from more than 200 witnesses.

    Assistant Commissioner Steve Lancaster promised further arrests, with investigations ongoing both domestically and abroad.

    “From a deterrence perspective, this is not the end,” Lancaster told reporters.

    “It is likely that if you are a significant people-smuggling organizer that you are likely to be known by us. I guarantee you there will be further arrests made.”

    AFP

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