Join and savor the ‘Adobo Movement’

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Lariza’s Seafood Adobo is a mixture of mussels, prawns and crabs stirred in a mixture of vinegar and soy sauce, garlic, onion, pepper and finished off with cheese on top to add a creamy, tangy taste

Lariza’s Seafood Adobo is a mixture of mussels, prawns and crabs stirred in a mixture of vinegar and soy sauce, garlic, onion, pepper and finished off with cheese on top to add a creamy, tangy taste

Chef Nancy Reyes-Lumen will be happy to know that she is not alone in her advocacy to achieve an official proclamation of the Adobo as the Philippines’ national dish.

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Inspired by how Filipinos across the regions preserve their respective versions of the adobo—based how the traditional comfort food is prepared according to flavor preferences and access to local ingredients—homegrown vinegar brand Datu Puti created the “Adobo Movement” to similarly push for the dish to be the “pambansang ulam” or national dish.

Celebrating the cultural heritage of the adobo, this advocacy has in fact reached much acclaim and has even been echoed by efforts in Congress. In fact, Bohol First District Representative Rene Relampagos filed House Bill 3926 in 2014, which sought to formally declare adobo as the national dish. The Datu Puti Adobo Movement has actively drawn support for the said bill through a petition since launching the advocacy in June.

To get people more involved in the Adobo Movement, the vinegar brand continues to host exciting events that seek to keep adobo in the common culinary consciousness.

The Oinkery’s Pugon Smoked Pork Adobo: pork shoulder pugon-smoked for eight hours, glazed with a rich Cebu-style adobo sauce, and garnished with fresh manggang hilaw

The Oinkery’s Pugon Smoked Pork Adobo: pork shoulder pugon-smoked for eight hours, glazed with a rich Cebu-style adobo sauce, and garnished with fresh manggang hilaw

Recently, it gathered Mercato Centrale’s veteran home-based cooks to create their own special Adobo dish. Fourteen entries were selected based on various criteria, including: creativity of concept, which looks at the story behind the dish as well as originality, branding and cooking technique; innovation, noting the use of unique special ingredients and Datu Puti products; and Philippine culinary heritage, including how it adopts and represents regional cooking styles.

Among the participants, top entries that wowed the crowd were chosen as Adobo Challenge Winners: The Oinkery’s Pugon-Smoked Adobo at first place; Dayrit’s Adobong Laing Pinangat at second place; Bakmi Nyonya’s Babi Kekap Adobo Nyonya at third place; and Lariza’s Seafood Adobo for People’s Choice Award.

With initiatives like the Adobo Challenge, the warm response of urban foodies and a slew of upcoming events and activities, the Adobo Movement has definitely made strides in rallying more people behind the nation’s ulam of choice.

Adobo lovers—no matter how they cook the dish—are all invited to support the Adobo Movement straight from their homes by signing the petition at www.adobomovement.com.

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