• Of mothers, daughters and beauty

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    ‘Mom-bassadors’ Christine Jacob, Tintin Bersola-Babao and Maricel Laxa-Pangilinan know they are responsible for instilling a positive mindset among their children

    ‘Mom-bassadors’ Christine Jacob, Tintin Bersola-Babao and Maricel Laxa-Pangilinan know they are responsible for instilling a positive mindset among their children

    Dove’s #WeAreBeautiful campaign begins
    In 2013, Dove commissioned a local survey and came up with a heartbreaking discovery that only seven percent of Filipinas see themselves as beautiful. Acting quickly on the issue, the beauty brand launched the nationwide #IamBeautiful campaign that encouraged women to see their real beauty through self-acceptance and self-worth.

    Reaching out to over 1 million Filipinas, Dove achieved its mission and changed their lives.

    A year since the successful and effective campaign, the hair and skincare brand realized the need to look into the adolescent Filipina, who apparently experience what has come to be called “beauty anxiety” just as much as adults.

    Thus, Dove launched the new chapter of its #IamBeautiful campaign with Unilever’s marketing director for the brand, Mian Datu-David in the lead.

    “To begin this second phase of the campaign, my team and set forth to answer the questions, ‘Why does beauty become a source of insecurities?’ and ‘When do women stop feeling good about themselves’?” she related.

    Unilever executives Mian Datu-David and Doray Dee lead the launch of #WeAreBeautiful

    Unilever executives Mian Datu-David and Doray Dee lead the launch of #WeAreBeautiful

    The company conducted a whole new survey involving over 200 Filipina adolescents aged 11 to 18 from Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao and discovered the following: “Two out of three young Filipino girls feel pressured to be beautiful. Almost seven out of the 10 girls consciously avoid activities just because of the way they look. Four out of 10 young Filipino girls in that survey know a case of bullying, whether it’s in their school or in social media, or in the immediate circle of their friends.”

    The results further revealed that in dealing with these situations and finding help, young Filipinas immediately turn to their mothers.

    “The most important person who can still influence the way a young girl looks at herself is her mother, and thankfully, she is right at home,” Datu continued. “And so today we launch #WeareBeautiful. We encourage mothers and daughters to declare on social media how beautiful they are with the hashtag.”

    With this, Dove hopes they can enable moms across the country to teach their daughters to believe in their own beauty, and in the process effectively create a new generation of empowered women.

    To show how moms can boost their daughters’ confidence, Dove invited celebrities Maricel Laxa-Pangilinan, Christine Jacob and Tintin Bersola-Babao to the launch and participate in a panel discussion led by Child Psychologist Dr. Honey Carandang, Unilever head of public relations Apples Aberin, and event host Lexi Schulze.

    Carandang informed the panel of mothers that a young person is not fully capable of critical thinking and therefore absorbs everything they see or hear around them. Thus, when a child sees her mother unhappy with certain parts of their face and body, it is highly possible that they will also feel the same way. A confident and encouraging mother, on the other hand, is more likely to raise a daughter with a similar mindset.

    News anchor Bersola-Babao took the opportunity to share that her mother was pivotal in helping her overcome being bullied in her teenage years.

    The broadcaster is now a mother of two, and happily related that her eldest, a girl, is a confident little lady.

    Meanwhile, former actress Laxa-Pangilinan and TV host Jacob, who both have five beautiful children each, encouraged mothers to never neglect themselves and to love themselves in order to pass on a positive mindset to their children.

    “My message to mothers is they have to love themselves. Because only in doing that will their children learn that they also need to love themselves. If they don’t love themselves, they can’t give that love to others,” Laxa-Pangilinan ended.

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