National Artist Lumbera graces ‘Dayaw’

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National Artist for Literature Bienvenido Lumbera (middle) enjoys the ‘Hadang’ ritual during the opening ceremonies of Dayaw Taboan Festival. With him are (from left) Subcommission on Cultural Communities and Traditional Arts (SCCTA) head Joycie Dorado-Alegre (standing), former Subcommission on Cultural Dissemination head Alice Pañares, and writer Victor Sugbo

National Artist for Literature Bienvenido Lumbera (middle) enjoys the ‘Hadang’ ritual during the opening ceremonies of Dayaw Taboan Festival. With him are (from left) Subcommission on Cultural Communities and Traditional Arts (SCCTA) head Joycie Dorado-Alegre (standing), former Subcommission on Cultural Dissemination head Alice Pañares, and writer Victor Sugbo

National Artist for Literature Bienvenido Lumbera attended the Dayaw Taboan, the annual festival of indigenous Filipino cultures, that opened at the University of the Philippines-Tacloban, Leyte on February 7 and 8.

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Organized by the National Commission for Culture and the Arts (NCCA), the festival left it’s original Dayaw format, which was previously held in October. This year, the Taboan, the literary festival part of the National Arts Month, was infused. Take note, however, the actual Taboan will still be held in Subic Freeport Zone on February 24 to 26.

With the theme “Paglaum ha panahon han kataragman” (Hope at a Time of Crisis), Dayaw Taboan is spearheaded by the NCCA’s Subcommission on Cultural Communities and Traditional Arts (SCCTA), under commissioner Joycie Dorado-Alegre.

The Lamiraw Awards for the Pillars of Lamiraw Workshop were awarded to Victor Sugbo, Merlie Alunan and David Genotiva. Other events took place, such as the poetry performance by the NwSSU Lamiraw and Dagway performers, a poetry reading of Katig Writers, and a presentation and recital of workshop outputs of poetry therapy by the Candajug children workshop participants.

Dayaw Taboan aims to highlight the importance and richness of indigenous cultures, discuss issues confronting indigenous peoples today, and allow interaction among cultural communities. It also aimed to mine traditional knowledge, as well as draw inspiration and insight from indigenous ways of life to find solutions for modern problems.

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