Olympic debut shines light on martial art

0
Karate master Mamoru Nakamoto, a high-ranking expert of the Okinawa Kobudo traditional weapons system, using a pair of “sai” to demonstrate his skills at a training hall in Naha, Okinawa prefecture.  AFP PHOTO

Karate master Mamoru Nakamoto, a high-ranking expert of the Okinawa Kobudo traditional weapons system, using a pair of “sai” to demonstrate his skills at a training hall in Naha, Okinawa prefecture. AFP PHOTO

NAHA, Japan: Hollywood may have kicked karate onto the world stage, but its first-ever inclusion at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics promises to shine a light on the rich history of the discipline.

Advertisements

At 78, sensei Masahiro Nakamoto has been waiting decades for this decision, insisting there is far more to the martial art than the caricature depicted in films such as Karate Kid and by action stars Chuck Norris and Jean-Claude Van Damme.

“This is the art of defence,” the karate master told AFP at his dojo in Naha, Okinawa — an island chain some 600 kilometres (375 miles) from the southern tip of mainland Japan.

“You don’t go just kicking and punching, you receive your opponent’s blow. Defending yourself translates into offence,” he added.

At the Tokyo Games, 80 competitors will take part in the Karate event. It joins surfing, skateboarding, climbing and baseball-softball as new sports included for the 2020 edition.

“The dreams of the world’s karate athletes came true when the (International Olympic Committee) made its decision,” said Japan Karate do Federation vice president Shigeo Kurihara.

“It’s an historic event — it was a day of joy for all of us.”

A blend of indigenous fighting styles, karate was born in Okinawa in the 15th century when the area was ruled by the independent Ryukyu Kingdom. Strong trading links meant the sport was also influenced by Chinese martial arts.

It is far older than the modern Olympics and today has at least 10 million registered practitioners worldwide, and yet it has struggled to make the case for inclusion in the Games.

By contrast, judo, a Japanese martial art, and Korea’s taekwondo are already permanent fixtures on the roster. Judo made its Olympic debut when Tokyo hosted the 1964 Games while taekwondo made its first appearance at the global event in 1988.

Integrating karate into the Olympics has been delayed by divisions in the movement around the world, with stalwarts long preferring to adhere to their interpretation rather than to work together to create an global art form.

“The variety of styles – more than 20 – complicated efforts to unify karate,” said Francis Didier, vice president of the World Karate Federation.

“It took a bit too long to modernise the rules of competition,” he admitted.

Sport karate, for example, calls for competition rules where opponents have to control their blows, while traditional karate allows for harder shots but requires significant protective gear, such as boxing gloves and helmets.

The martial art was only brought to Tokyo in the early 20th century when Gichin Funakoshi, regarded as the father of modern karate, moved from Naha.

“Okinawa was the place where karate’s spi-rituality developed,” explains Kurihara.

AFP

Share.
loading...
Loading...

Please follow our commenting guidelines.

Comments are closed.