‘PH can be economic, moral force in Asia’

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WITH the fundamentals for a sustainable growth, the Philippines can become an economic and moral force that can lead an effort to realize the Association of Southeast Asian Nations’ (Asean) full potential and stabilize the rest of Asia.

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THUMBS UP FOR PH Chamber of Commerce of the Philippine Islands President Jose Luis Yulo Jr. (left) and Global Peace Foundation founder Hyun Jin Preston Moon flash the thumbs up sign during the Global Peace Economic Forum 2017 on Wednesday at the Marriott Grand Ballroom in Pasay City. PHOTO BY ROGER RAÑADA

Hyun Jin Preston Moon, founder and chairman of the Global Peace Foundation, bared this vision Wednesday before local and foreign delegates attending the foundation’s four-day convention at Mariott Hotel in Pasay City.

For a nation to achieve economic prosperity, it should have a free economic system anchored on innovation and entrepreneurship, but governed by sufficient regulatory and enforcement mechanisms to compel everybody to behave in a way that aligns to societal values and levels the playing field for all its citizens, he said.

Government, he stressed, should do away with the so-called “closed system” that only benefits those with influence and social access, and deprives the “little guy” with greater ideas and huge dreams of a shot to prosperity.

Moon however stressed that there are no shortcuts in life, and for a country to achieve a sustainable, equitable and prosperous economy, it needs people of conscience, whose collective decisions advance the greater good instead of benefiting a few.

“The overarching economic approach of the Global Peace Foundation, hence, calls for less government interference in the marketplace in line with classic liberal economic principles with one very important addition – the development of societies in which the collective ethos is rooted on universally accepted moral ethic that guides the national and global economic systems. Systems, remember, are values-neutral. It is people who infuse those structures with their unique values perspectives that leads to varying outcomes, whether good or bad,” he said.

Key trading hub

Moon said the Philippines was ripe to play a key role, thrive economically and lead Asean to its full potential, leading to peace and stability in Asia.

He cited, among others, the Philippines’ strategic location and key ties with prosperous countries like Korea, Japan, the US, China and India, abundant natural resources and an English-speaking workforce.

“More importantly, I believe the Philippines can become a key trade and economic hub in the larger Pacific Rim region that links East and West as a gateway, whereby it offers distribution, professional services and manufacturing capabilities, among others,” he said.

The Philippines, as chairman of this year’s Asean meetings, can set the tone for the 10 member-countries to demonstrate proper moral and innovative leadership, Moon said.

He pointed out that the 10 Asean member-nations have a combined gross domestic product (GDP) of more than $2.6 trillion and a population of over 622 million in a strategically important part of the world.

Moon noted that in the 2017 Economic Freedom Index published by the Washington-based Heritage Foundation, the Philippines moved 12 notches higher.

He said that since 2012, the Philippines has recorded a remarkable growth rate, saying that the country’s GDP growth for 2016 of 6.8 percent was the second best in Asia, after India.

Moon said the reasonably low level of foreign debt, good macroeconomic fundamentals and robust economic growth gave comfort to international markets and rating agencies.

“The Philippines is also fortunate to be among the world’s top five minerals reserve countries, with mining permits currently given to cover only 2 percent of the reserve area, which promises enormous future revenue opportunities,” he added.

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6 Comments

  1. The government always says stuff like this.
    Aquino patted himself on the back for 6 years while lying about the state of the country in every national SONA address.

    Active terrorism in the country ( Kidnapping for ransom and beheading )

    A corrupt congress controlled by dynasties
    120 pork barrel thieves on the Napoles list and only 3 opposition senators charged, The other 117 no charges.

    Corrupt PNP.( Police ) – kidnapping, murder, extortion.

    Expensive electric power and substandard service (owned by foreigners)
    Expensive and slow internet (owned by foreigners)
    Media (owned by the same foreigners that own the electric and internet)
    Water service (same foreign owners)
    Election tampering
    Court system dysfunctional ( average time to trial 9 years )
    Selective justice

    High poverty rate
    Low wages, long hours, high underemployment rate

    Prison’s falling apart
    MRT falling apart

    Flooding in major cities
    Grid lock in major cities

    The Philippines is falling apart due to neglect and will take decades of serious oversight and spending to catch up.

    The only way the Philippines shows favorable economic growth is allowing everything else to fall apart.

    A Economic and Moral force ? No

  2. Economic growth always follow peace and order.. business will thrive only in towns, cities and regions with peace and serenity. More killings means fear for every investors to pour their money.

    • arnel amador on

      crimes and criminals were wiped out and economic growth achieved 9% per annum…that’s Davao!

    • crimes and criminals were wiped out and economic growth achieved 9% per annum…that’s Davao!
      ———————————————————-

      4th in murder (10.56 per 100,000); Cebu City ranked first with 14.13 murders per 100,000
      12th in robbery (71.65 per 100,000); Manila ranked first with 164.67 robberies per 100,000
      12th in theft (201.31 per 100,000); Baguio ranked first with 632.98 thefts per 100,000

      I don’t think wiped out means what you think it does, As you can plainly see Davao is a average city with the same problems as other cities

      Wiped out ? No

  3. The Philippines should strive to become a leader for SE Asia. But, it needs to overcome the old business as usual model and embrace change. Change is not easy. But it seems to be trying very hard to put itself back on the right path for its people.

    I hope for a much better future for my children. Needless to say, but I’ll say it anyway – being a narco-state is not the right path for the country or my family.