Philippine Fashion Week at 20

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Against all odds and amidst a growing number of similar shows, the Philippine Fashion Week is very much alive. On May 28 and 29, it marked its 20th year at the Discovery Primea in Makati City with Holiday 2016 collections from 12 of the best Filipino fashion designers.
Here is a run down of the two-day show with favorites from each designer:

Celine Borromeo
The Project Runway Season 4 second runner Celine Borromeo kicked off the anticipated Holiday 2016 shows at PhFW with her anthology La Femme Debonaire. Drawing inspiration from masculine shapes and cuts, she re-thought and reshaped these elements to complement the beauty of the female form. “The clothes are for the woman of today: strong, and independent, and values practicality and ease along with style,” said Borromeo.

Melchor Guinto
You can’t have luxury without a little mystery. Melchor Guinto brought together these two complimentary concepts in his collection, Enigma. The models looked seductively dapper in the designer’s holiday pieces. Dark hues of magenta, green, blue and black evoked a sense of secrecy and allure. Tailored pieces in sharp cuts deliver the aura of classic elegance. Moreover, Guinto’s sartorial presentation provided a complete wardrobe for the season.

Randall Solomon
Randall Solomon weaved a dramatic tale for his Holiday 2016 collection. Dubbed “Midnight Rose,” it reflected a young Parisian woman’s slow disillusionment from romance. As suggested by the name, the collection’s prominent hue was a dark berry shade. Keeping true to his theme, he used fabrics such as velvet satin, charmeuse, and satin chiffon. Solomon carries over a similar color palette for all his collections this year.


Arnold Galang
For several seasons, Arnold Galang had used his collections to advocate for peace. His Holiday 2016 presentation, titled Coalescent Culture: The Peace Collection Series, was no different. This time, he put focus on uniting diversities, and creating something new from the union. The collection was a study on the creative ways of combining patterns and textures resulting to cohesion and refinement.

Noel Crisostomo
For Holiday 2016, Noel Crisostomo designed for strong, courageous, and feisty women, thus served up a lot of sexy, form-fitting silhouettes in his collection called Love, Nostalgia, and Haute Couture. Show-stopping pieces featured plunging necklines and high slits oozing with confidence. A sense of whimsy were seen in appliqués and embellishments. Lastly, While and smarts were reflected in the impeccable tailoring of each piece.
Jerome Salaya Ang

Closing off the first day of PhFW Holiday 2016, Jerome Salaya Ang took on an ambitious feat for his first collection of the year. Aptly titling his anthology “Into the Unknown,” the designer tackled the ever changing and unpredictable nature, not just of fashion, but of everything. The predominantly womenswear collection explored modernity and the limits, or lack thereof what we can do with fabrics.

Jared Servano
Project Runway Season 4 first runner up, Jared Servano, took to the runway his design aesthetic through various creative manipulations, styles and inspirations of the traditional Blaan woman’s dress, the Albong. In his collection, Albong Odyssey, he explored the possibility of bringing cultural richness to mainstream fashion. With this unique fashion perspective and his interpretations of the Albong, Servano hoped to succeed in merging both modern and traditional artistry, technique and treatment in his designs.
Jeffrey Rogador

Jeffrey Rogador paid tribute to the culture, art and fabrics of the Philippines’ indigenous groups in his JR Holiday 2016 “Prints & Patterns” collection. He took inspiration from the intricate handwoven textiles of the Yakan, T’boli, Maranao, Ifugao and Bagobo groups, and translated them, along with his oil and acrylic paintings, to interpretations of urban wear.

This young, bold and bright streetwear collection also included sarong skirts and joggers. Lastly, he made use of basic silhouettes for classic pieces such as tanks, shirts, and trousers as well as hoodie blazers, sweaters and pullovers.

JunJun Cambe
JunJun Cambe showcased a two-part collection that transitioned from casual to evening glam. The first part aptly named Andros + Gyne was an assortment of unisex ensembles. Cambe highlights individualism by mixing and matching leather, stretch, mesh and cotton in this casual yet edgy line of apparel. Red carpet drama was the evident theme of part 2 in Cambe’s series of runway looks. Seen on the catwalk are classic lines in stretch crepe embellished with heavy embroidery interwoven with detailed beadwork Cambe is well-known for.

Sidney Perez Sio
Sidney Perez Sio explored the characteristics of the heart in his Holiday 2016 anthology entitled “10,000 Joys and 10,000 Sorrows.” The pieces were created inspired by the human heart through the lens of design. The dominant colors and patterns in this collection were pink, peach, red, black and rose print on neoprene fabric. Rose prints and black stripes represented a heart that throbs with both compassion and fear, while red symbolizes a happy heart.

Amir Sali
Known as the sought after designer of Saudi Arabian royalty, Amir Sali brought to the Philippine Fashion Week runway his elegant and exquisite creations in his Simplified Glory collection. In the runway, his models exuded simplicity, strength, glory and purity. Sali showcased his interpretation of this gentle yet powerful woman with loose silhouettes in white and gold.

Cherry Samuya Veric
Cherry Samuya Veric traded his dripping laceworks and ornamented appliqués for bolder patterns in his breathtaking collection for the Philippine Fashion Week. He built on the story of West meeting East through a fusion of indigenous patterns and modern forms. The lean lines and stunning visuals emphasized the alluring stylishness of ethnic patterns, and by mixing native designs with modern cosmopolitan trends. Veric proved that native design can be very appealing on a global scale.

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