Philippine Hawk Eagle turned over to DENR

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The Philippine Hawk Eagle, local name ‘banog,’ is commonly mistaken as the Philippine Eagle

The Philippine Hawk Eagle, local name ‘banog,’ is commonly mistaken as the Philippine Eagle

ILAGAN City: A captured Philippine Hawk Eagle (Nisaetus philippensis) was turned over by Seth Fabros of Sinamar Roxas, Isabela to the Department of Environment and Natural Resources In-charge, Office of CENRO Roxas Samuel Berlin.

The Philippine Hawk Eagle, local name Banog, is a medium-sized raptor that has been feared close to extinction attributed to deforestation. Commonly mistaken as the Philippine Eagle, it is also endemic to the forests of the Philippines. It can stand up to 30 inches tall with a wingspan twice the length of its body and can weigh up to two kilograms. It perches in dense canopies and often soars.

The adult of the dark-brown bird is 25.2 to 27.2 inches long, with a long crest of four or five feathers protruding from its crown.

Berlin divulged the steps to save the species by reporting illegal wildlife trade, keeping them in the wild by not hunting, killing or trading them, and by planting native trees to restore degraded habitats.


PENRO William Savella said that the eagles will be turned over to the Ilagan Sanctuary in this City for rehabilitation until they are healthy enough to be released into their natural habitat.

The Ilagan sanctuary which is an acronym for Isabela’s Landmark, Animals, Garden and Nature, is a portion of Fuyot Spring National Park which was declared a protected area on October 8, 1938 by virtue of Presidential Proclamation 327 issued by the late president Manuel Quezon to further conserve our natural resources.

(Help keep wildlife in the wild. Do not capture, buy, or sell wildlife. Report all injured or sold wildlife to your local Department of Environment and Natural Resources office.)

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