• PNoy accepts Ninoy’s award from Korean journalists

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    President Benigno Aquino 3rd  offers a wreath at the Hall of Heroes War Memorial of Korea in Seoul on Friday. Aquino’s father, Benigno ‘Ninoy’ Aquino Jr. was cited for his role as  Manila Times correspondent who covered the Korean War.  Malacañang photo

    President Benigno Aquino 3rd offers a wreath at the Hall of Heroes War Memorial of Korea in Seoul on Friday. Aquino’s father, Benigno ‘Ninoy’ Aquino Jr. was cited for his role as Manila Times correspondent who covered the Korean War. Malacañang photo

    Six decades ago, Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. covered the Korean War for The Manila Times.

    Aquino was only 17 years old when The Times sent him to the frontline to write about the Filipino troops in the United Nations coalition fighting North Korean and later Chinese troops in the Korean peninsula.

    On Friday, Ninoy’s son, President Benigno S. Aquino 3rd, accepted a posthumous award in behalf of his father for “gallantry and valuable contribution for world peace and freedom.”

    The award was given by the Korea Journalists Society and the Korea War Correspondents Association.

    During a toast at a state dinner later, South Korean President Park Geun-hye also lauded Ninoy’s service as war correspondent.

    ”Senator Aquino, who in those days had actually been 17 years of age, reported that he was 18 years old as a war correspondent who roamed the fields of battle together with some 7,400 Filipino troops who were sent to Korea. And through his writings that would later become history, let the world know how the war was unfolding,” Park said.

    ”As I see it, that sacrifice and dedication have been passed down to the new generation paving the way to a precious meeting today. May the events today mark the beginning of deeper ties of friendship between our countries and a happier future awaiting both our peoples,” she added.

    President Aquino recalled how Filipinos and Koreans fought together in 1950.

    “Just as we were partners in the past, today we remain committed to assisting one another, standing shoulder to shoulder in working to foster peace, stability and cooperation in our part of the world,” Aquino said.

    Ninoy started his journalism career at The Times. As correspondent, he sent dispatches from around Southeast Asia.

    Asked why The Times assigned Ninoy to Korea when he was so young, Joaquin “Chino” Roces, The Times’ publisher at the time, said, “That was the recommendation of the editor.”

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    2 Comments

    1. Other than his news feeds to his sponsor, The Manila Times, did any of the world news outlets at that time ever picked up any of his news reportage/coverage that could have made significant contributions to the cause of freedom or one that precipitated the cessation of hostilities to led to the Armistice? The citation is for “gallantry” and I sure would like to know if this is in the same context as the PH soldiers in Korea who paid with their own blood and life.

    2. Why PNoy insist in going to South Korea to accept an award for his father is clearly trying to revive his ever dwindling popularity. But adding insult to injury he should have not gone there for a simple photo-op when the people in the Visayas are suffering due to the earthquake which left thousands homeless and infrastructure in millions were affected. It is not PNoy’s award anyway so he could have sent his sisters, Balsy, Viel or that talkative, tsismosa Kris to accept the award for their father, repeat, their father, Ninoy.