The business and economics of graduation

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Ej Lopez

Ej Lopez

There’s a time a for joy, a time for tears, A time we’ll treasure through the years, We’ll remember always, graduation day.

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The lyrics of the song connote a lot of meaning that initially may warm our hearts; that after at least a grueling14 years of burning eyebrows to pursue knowledge and after an unprecedented amount of educational investments poured in by your benefactors and parents for your studies, finally you passed the bar of knowledge and can now pursue your own career. Fourteen years of education or more has created a potentially productive capital in your person. Whereas before you were not armed with credentials to speak of, today with all the accolades tucked under your belt, you can now boast of your readiness for competition.

But is that a guarantee of a promising career or even employment after graduation?

In the midst of all these expectant graduates, does the economy have the facilities to accommodate them all in the job market? With all the different and varied kinds of job fairs proliferating around, it seems the job market is full of hope for these young people whose level of enthusiasm is very high. Every year around 400,000 people graduate from college and become a part of the labor market, and only around 30 percent of these new graduates get to be hired. The rest are added to the growing ranks of the unemployed, which as of late stood at about 12 million.

This does not include yet the big chunk of the employed people in the job market who are underemployed, which has been confirmed as a much bigger problem than unemployment. A great number of these young people who will join the ranks of the labor market will be part of the statistical data of either the unemployed or the underemployed, which explains the growth “characteristics” that we are currently experiencing.

This problem of unemployment has been hounding the administration, past and present. It will perhaps take another lifetime in order to resolve this age-old dilemma. Key to this problem is the failure of the administration to concretize the public-private partnership (PPP) program, supposed to be the banner program of the Aquino administration that was meant to attract investors but up to now has remained anemic. It would have addressed the unemployment problem by a thousand-fold had there been a realization of this administration’s goal.

Historic pact
The expected signing of the historic peace pact between the government and Bangsa Moro hopefully will signal the transition to development in the southern region. The economic development in the South is hindered by all kinds of disorder and armed struggles. This has been the trend decades back.

With the signing of the Comprehensive Agreement on the Bangsamoro (CAB), development in that part of the country is within reach. It is not far-fetched that investments from the urban centers will find their way to the rural parts of Mindanao. Remember that peace is immeasurably one of the biggest indicators of investment interest.

In the midst of all these adversities, it is quite refreshing to know that despite differences in principles, political and religious ideologies, we can still come up with a common agenda to keep our people united in striving for a common cause. Peace is the foremost factor that people all over the world are clamoring for and if only for that, the road to becoming an economic tiger is now more achievable and realizable.

Malaysia Airlines tragedy
The tragic end to Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 signals that, despite the advancement in technology that promises information at our fingertips, the essential search for the missing plane has ended, leaving certain doubts as to the clarity of the information presented.

The mysterious disappearance of the ill-fated plane creates a spine-tingling sensation to everyone, that there will always be that Divine Creator who controls everything despite the multitude of technological advancements that proliferate in the world around us.

“Cui est Gloria.”

For comments email doc.ejlopez@gmail.com with cc to opinion@manilatimes.net.

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