• The disappearance of public places

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    German photographer Thies Rätzke will facilitate the photography fieldwork with Filipino photojournalists Veejay Villafranca and Charlie Saceda

    German photographer Thies Rätzke will facilitate the photography fieldwork with Filipino photojournalists Veejay Villafranca and Charlie Saceda

    Goethe-Institut uses photography to tackle the issue in Manila
    The Goethe-Institut—the German cultural center in the Philippines—sets out to address the issue of disappearing public spaces in Metro Manila with a photography fieldwork from April 12 to 18.

    To be facilitated by German photographer Thies Rätzke together with Filipino photojournalists Veejay Villafranca and Charlie Saceda, the fieldwork aims to come up with photo stories exploring the issue caused by increasing privatization of urban places.

    A group of six photographer-participants from different parts of the Philippines will undergo the fieldwork and will also be mentored by invited photographer-lecturer Andrew Esiebo on the side. Esiebo is a renowned photographer from Lagos, Nigeria—a city that shares the problem of disappearing public spaces with Manila.

    The week-long fieldwork will conclude with a presentation of the photo stories on April 18 at 7 p.m. in Le Café Curieux, Polaris corner Badajos St., Bel-Air Soho, Makati City.

    This project is initiated by the Goethe-Institut in the cities of Manila, Lagos and Bogotá (Columbia), where the expansion of gated communities and disappearing public spaces are a prevalent issue.

    Lagos and Bogotá are the next stops of Thies Rätzke who would also be doing photography fieldworks there after his stay in Manila.

    The fieldwork participants are composed of hobbyists from different fields, students, and semi-professional photographers who were part of Goethe-Institut’s climate change photography project in Tacloban last year.

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    1 Comment

    1. It is quite timely that such endeavor be made about public places. More often when you come back to the place of your youth you will be dismayed at the site since it is no longer there.