The parallels among grappling arts

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 I’m controlling my opponent by grabbing the back of his head with my right arm, and pulling his face against my right bicep.

I’m controlling my opponent by grabbing the back of his head with my right arm, and pulling his face against my right bicep.

I slide his face toward my chest while my left hand is pulling down his right arm.

I slide his face toward my chest while my left hand is pulling down his right arm.

There are many styles of grappling and often the players  of each style would boast of their superiority over other styles. But when they engage in a grappling match, similarities of familiar  moves are seen.

Our bodies can only do so much in terms of movement and reactions, and in most cases, it is easy to spot the similarities among the different grappling arts. Everybody goes through the same foundational materials, and basic movements are the techniques being used in most grappling matches. Take boxing and karate for instance, they may differ in many ways of throwing their punches, but during a match between two styles of punching, the same straight punches, the same delivery of power are seen. Why? Because everybody goes back to the same basics.

How do a judo, jiu-jitsu, and sambo player move when the gi (traditional uniform) is taken out? Compare the movements to freestyle or Greco-Roman wrestling and the familiar movements will come out. The basics of grappling arts all carry the same formula, only expressed in different manners. Recently, I spent some time with catch wrestlers in search of uncommon movements distinct from sambo and freestyle wrestling.

My right arms slides down and wrap around his left bicep, forcing his left arm to come up. Simultaneously, my left arm (hidden from photo) is pushing down the back of his right shoulder. At this point, I am forcing his body to twist.

My right arms slides down and wrap around his left bicep, forcing his left arm to come up. Simultaneously, my left arm (hidden from photo) is pushing down the back of his right shoulder. At this point, I am forcing his body to twist.

The only thing that separates every grappling art from each other is the rules being implemented during a match. The lesser the rules, the more dangerous and more pronounced the nature of grappling art becomes. Grappling is a chess game, and all movements have counter movements, depending on the level of skills and luck of a practitioner.


Let’s examine the simple takedown. Destroying an opponent’s balance and gaining control of the fight on the ground is called a takedown. While some practitioners of the grappling arts consider throwing an opponent a kind of takedown, many grapplers   agree that a throw and a takedown are far from being the same. A typical takedown often begins by controlling or grabbing the leg. But in some cases, a takedown can also be applied by controlling the   opponent’s shoulders. The following is a demonstration of a simple takedown that can be effective if  executed properly.

When his head is at the same level of my belly, both arms will control his head, while my upper body weight is above his nape.

When his head is at the same level of my belly, both arms will control his head, while my upper body weight is above his nape.

“Mumbakki” Daniel Foronda is an MMA champion  and a Filipino martial arts expert.

He is currently based in Russia where he is a combat  tactical trainer to the country’s Military  Special Forces.

 

 

 

While twisting my opponent (this application must be fast and with momentum), as soon as his balance is off, I will immediately put the weight of my upper body against his chest.

While twisting my opponent (this application must be fast and with momentum), as soon as his balance is off, I will immediately put the weight of my upper body against his chest.

I pin my opponent down with my right elbow on his neck, and my bodyweight on top of his upper body.

I pin my opponent down with my right elbow on his neck, and my bodyweight on top of his upper body.

 

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