• US slaps new sanctions on Venezuela

    0

    CARACAS: The United States imposed new sanctions on crisis-hit Venezuela on Wednesday, targeting members of a controversial, all-powerful, loyalist assembly installed last week to bolster what Washington calls the “dictatorship” of President Nicolas Maduro.

    The measures were aimed at six members of the so-called Constituent Assembly—among them the brother of late president Hugo Chavez—as well as a military officer in charge of security for the body, and a board member of the national electoral authority.

    They added to previous US sanctions on Maduro himself—a rare step against a sitting head of state—imposed just before the assembly was elected on July 30 in a vote marred by violence, fraud allegations and an opposition boycott.

    “President Maduro swore in this illegitimate Constituent Assembly to further entrench his dictatorship, and continues to tighten his grip on the country,” US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said in a statement.

    “This regime’s disregard for the will of the Venezuelan people is unacceptable, and the United States will stand with them in opposition to tyranny until Venezuela is restored to a peaceful and prosperous democracy.”

    The Venezuelan government reacted by saying the US was “making a fool of itself in front of the world.”

    It “doesn’t respect any criterion, any basic principle of international law,” Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza told state television. “Venezuela can’t be sanctioned for anything, nor by anybody.”

    The US announcement came as the Constituent Assembly and Venezuela’s supreme court took actions to limit the opposition’s ability to challenge Maduro.

    The assembly has established a “truth commission” which Maduro has said should examine alleged crimes by opposition leaders—especially those in charge of the country’s legislature, which his Socialist Party lost control of two years ago.

    Sweeping powers
    The assembly has also fired the attorney general, Luisa Ortega, who broke ranks to become an outspoken critic of the president.

    The supreme court ordered the jailing of an opposition mayor who allowed anti-government protests in his Caracas district, and was mulling similar cases against others.

    Ostensibly brought in to rewrite the constitution, the Constituent Assembly has sweeping powers to override all other branches of government.

    It has vowed to remain in operation for up to two years—beyond the scheduled end of Maduro’s term in 2019.

    Those targeted in the US sanctions announced Wednesday included Adan Coromoto Chavez, the brother of the late president who was Maduro’s mentor before he died of cancer in 2013.

    The National Electoral Council board member, Tania D’Amelio Cardiet, was designated for defending the assembly and for suspicion of being involved in fraud in its choosing.

     

    Share.
    loading...
    Loading...

    Please follow our commenting guidelines.

    Leave A Reply

    Please follow our commenting guidelines.