• Using ‘Movie therapy’ in raising children

    0
    Kumon Philippines Inc. president Tadashi Nakatsuka (middle), with Licensed GEP Facilitators, Mr. and Mrs. Francisco Enrile

    Kumon Philippines Inc. president Tadashi Nakatsuka (middle), with Licensed GEP Facilitators, Mr. and Mrs. Francisco Enrile

    For every parent there is no better reward than raising their children right and providing them with the best things in life. They also have the very important role of guiding their children to reach their full potential.

    On its sixth year, the Kumon Philippines’ Education and Parenting Seminars (KPEPS) reaches out to parents outside Metro Manila as it recently held a couple of seminars in Pampanga and Iloilo. The seminars were a partnership between Kumon and Good Enough Parenting (GEP) that seeks to further its mission of educating parents with strategies to help them raise a responsible and happy child.

    The KPEPS also aims to educate and enlighten parents on the different topics that will aid them in raising a responsible and happy child.

    A supplemental learning program that offers math and reading programs, Kumon originated from Japan when Toru Kumon developed a system to help his eldest son in school.

    The method has proven to be so successful there are currently 26,000 Kumon Centers in 46 countries with some 16 million enrollees. In the Philippines, there are more than 57,000 enrollees.

    Good Enough Parenting, meanwhile, teaches parents about core emotional needs of children such as connection and acceptance, healthy autonomy and performance, reasonable limits, realistic expectations, and spiritual values and community.

    GEP achieves this through Movie Therapy, to teach parents how to meet these needs and provide parenting that is “good enough” to prevent “life traps” from developing in their children.

    “In a world of too much information, ‘Good Enough Parenting’ uses movies to teach parents how to meet core needs, and, at the same time, how to avoid passing down their own dysfunctional behaviors,” said Dr Jeffrey Young, of the Department of Psychiatry at the Columbia University, USA.

    During the media lunch, GEP used several film clips to show how a family thought one of their children was just a lazy student when the kid in fact is suffering from dyslexia.

    With KPEPS, the two institutions recognize parents and other associates as their partners in the endless pursuit to maximize what their children can do, what their children can do more, and what their children can do best.

    Ed Uy

    Share.
    loading...
    Loading...

    Please follow our commenting guidelines.

    Comments are closed.