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Home World At a Glance Community leaving after Mexico violence arrives in Arizona

Community leaving after Mexico violence arrives in Arizona

 

TUCSON, Arizona: An 18-vehicle caravan carrying about 100 members of an offshoot Mormon community leaving their homes after a violent attack in Mexico arrived in Arizona on Saturday.

The families came nearly a week after the attack Monday in which nine women and children were killed by what authorities said were hit men from drug cartels.

On Saturday, families went in and out of a gas station in Douglas near the port of entry as the sun began to set, the Arizona Daily Star reported.


They filled up on gas, put air in their tires and got food before getting back on the road on their way to Tucson and Phoenix. Their trucks were loaded with boxes, bicycles, spare tires and bags, all their belongings packed as they left the communities in Mexico that their families have called home since the 1950s, the newspaper reported.

The families had lived in two hamlets in Mexico’s Sonora state: La Mora and Colonia LeBaron. Other residents of the hamlets planned to depart in the coming days.

Monday’s deadly attack occurred as the women traveled with their children to visit relatives.

The spread-out community traces its origins to the end of polygamy more than a century ago by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, forcing Mormon families in the US with multiple wives to establish offshoots elsewhere.

Bryce Langford, whose mother was one of the women killed, told the Daily Star Saturday that he was on his way to visit his brother at a hospital in Tucson.

Langford’s mother, Dawna Ray Langford, 43, was killed along with two of her sons, ages 11 and 2. She is survived by 11 children and her husband, Bryce Langford told the newspaper.

Of the children who escaped, one was shot in the face, another in the foot. One girl suffered gunshot wounds to her back and foot.

Another of Langford’s brothers hid six children in brush and walked back to La Mora to get help.

“We’re very proud of him,” Langford told the newspaper. “To be able to make those kind of decisions under those circumstances is something not a lot of people can say they can do.” AP

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Today’s Front Page February 20, 2020

Today’s Front Page February 20, 2020