The mighty Svartisen glacier in Norway in 1974. The world’s glaciers which feed irrigation systems and hydropower plants continue retreating due to climate change. PHOTO BY ARNE STINUS
The mighty Svartisen glacier in Norway in 1974. The world’s glaciers which feed irrigation systems and hydropower plants continue retreating due to climate change. PHOTO BY ARNE STINUS

ONE could speculate as to the ecological footprint and greenhouse gas emissions generated by the 40,000 or more who are gathered at Sharm El-Sheikh in Egypt this week. How many airplanes did these 40,000 persons fill? How many of the participants in the 27th Conference of Parties (COP27) and its side events chose less polluting modes of transportation such as ship or train? Ajit Rajagopal, maybe the only person who walked to Sharm El-Sheikh, was arrested!

OK, let's put aside cynicism and focus on what is at stake: the COP27 has been dubbed "Climate Implementation Summit" to signify that the time for talk is over and now is the time for action. So far pledges to cut greenhouse emissions are way below what is needed. Will COP27 be able to set the world on a path to push back climate change and save the planet, thus proving skeptics and critics — such as The Economist ("Say goodbye to 1.5 C") and Greta Thunberg ("COPs are not really working") — wrong?

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